Frozen water main - suggestions?

I'm shocked at the resilience of the ice. Must be a big ass section frozen solid. As soon as a tiny stream can pass through erosion and the warmth of the water would rip it apart in no time, but no leak in the ice has formed even in this warmth and with the amps on it.
yeah if it's sparking there is current going through it. hopefully it's going through the pipe and not just through the water on the lawn.
 

fidodie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
The cables are not warming either.

It looks like 3/4" galvanized feed. At 50+ years old. A little concerned about the successful outcome of this project.

No heat means little resistance. Ideas?
We trenching tomorrow?
 
The cables are not warming either.

It looks like 3/4" galvanized feed. At 50+ years old. A little concerned about the successful outcome of this project.

No heat means little resistance. Ideas?
We trenching tomorrow?
Do you have a clamp on amp meter?

Steel should be a good enough conductor, it has a lot more mass than copper though.
Really surprised this didn't work. If you have two of them hook them both up, it'll work or explode, both would be awesome.
 

trailhead

JORBA: Wildcat/Splitrock
JORBA.ORG
The open circuit voltage output of the hotshot is probably only a few volts. As the loop resistance increases, current goes down as the transformer cant supply the VAs.....current goes down...no heat.....make sure connections to pipe are good...bare metal....file...grind...will help
 

huffster

Well-Known Member
Thought: If pipe is broken in the ground between the 2 points you have clamped, you would not have a continuous circuit, thus you would not be warming the pipe. An amp meter would help determine if you have current flowing, thus a closed circuit. From what I briefly read about the Hot-Shot, there shouldn't be much to it, but you need continuous conductive material (metal pipe) to complete the circuit.
 

w_b

Well-Known Member
This thread is USELESS without a clamp on ammeter.

Better yet run some jumpers across your car battery and da pipe then rev the motor up to ludicrous speed.
What could go wrong?
 

fidodie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
watch this...

Hey @seanrunnette - did you hook them up in parallel or in series?

-----

there was a good connection to brass fittings on both ends. Solid spark when moving the clamp -
now, the problem may be that heat is caused by resistance. the juice may have an easy path with the wet soil, hence less resistance, less heat.
maybe no heat....I would still think the pipe is the easiest path and would get hot.

anyway - if this hasn't resolved by dawn, there is a party at the house tomorrow at noon. i'd recommend bringing shale bars, and explosives.
 

Dingo

Well-Known Member
watch this...

Hey @seanrunnette - did you hook them up in parallel or in series?

-----

there was a good connection to brass fittings on both ends. Solid spark when moving the clamp -
now, the problem may be that heat is caused by resistance. the juice may have an easy path with the wet soil, hence less resistance, less heat.
maybe no heat....I would still think the pipe is the easiest path and would get hot.

anyway - if this hasn't resolved by dawn, there is a party at the house tomorrow at noon. i'd recommend bringing shale bars, and explosives.
Solid spark, that juice is going some where. sure not the path of least resistance.