IGVENTURE

Some observations

@pooriggy won and podiumed multiple races this past season aboard his full rigid single speed racing against geared bikes with suspension. Also took H2h overall championship in 45+ Cat 1

He rode the tallboy yesterday, 2nd place finishers were both aboard single speeds.

@pooriggy won and podiumed multiple races this past season wearing Team MTBNJ lycra kit

He was full endurobro yesterday rocking baggies, baggies put which put Iggy in social mode I think :p

The race winners times are switched, the 2:33:26.3 was actually done by David. This means @David Taylor beat Igg by 19 minutes.

Lastly, I was able to finish race and in that 26 minute wait I was able to:
-Do a 15 minute cooldown around parking lot
-Leisurely change into normal clothes.
-After changing, neatly fold and put away my cycling gear
-Throw away the bag of napkins and bagel crumbs
-Make a recovery drink
-Call my GF for race update
-Chit chat with Dave, Don & Jamie

In conclusion Iggy belongs on full rigid singlespeed
LMAO. That was a fun time! Especially when @pooriggy pulled in in chill mode haha.
 

pooriggy

Well-Known Member
Team MTBNJ Halter's
Earlier this summer I got tickets for the Asbury music festival, Sea.Hear.Now. It seems that putting.periods.between.words.is a thing now, so I figured the music would be good. Mary contacted her college roommate from Brielle to see if she was interested.boom.yes. Her and boyfriend are in.
Oh hey, we're here.
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I have to admit leading up to this wknd. I was having 2nd thoughts about going, not that I would bail, but this meant missing Bikefest, which is like SHN without music, ocean and 19,700 less people. As I sit here, in a bit of a fog , processing everything that happened this wknd, I'd say the SHN was the right choice. I'm not gonna say some bs like life changing experience but damn I'd say that's the best Musicfest I've been to since OG Lollapalooza in 1991.
This set up was perfect, 2 stages at opposite ends of each other in the beach, the band plays for an hour on one stage and when their done another band starts their set at the opposite end, also there is another stage around the corner, so it's like 3 love holes...no waiting.
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Come to think of it, Palooza 91 and SHN are such contrasts. Music has changed and so have I, jeez, that was 27 years ago. At Palooza the vibe was a bit angrier, we beat the shit out of each other in that most pit, do kids still do this?, this weekend SHN sponsored free yoga in the mornings, which was one big lovefest, physically and emotionally.
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Also, I think they legalized weed for SHN, my clothes smell like i was sitting by a marijuana campfire, the shit people smoke now is so gd dank, compared to the 90's. They should make those Christmas tree air freshners in danky shit odor, when you get pulled over and the cop smells weed, you just point to the air freshener.

The first day the acts where ok, the English Beat was up beat, Blondie was tired, her band was awesome, Ben Harper is an awesome musician but can't relate to an audience and I bailed on Incubus, so I can't say much about them. I can say that I went broke eating and drinking, $11 beerz, $12 food, the food was decent and All Day IPA was a good choice. Although at one point they did run out of IPA and I found myself drinking Corona, man is that beer shit.

Sunday morning Mary and I drove back from Sandys house in Brielle to do yoga at 8:30. We where a bit tired but once we got moving we were fine. The instructor was really good, Eoin Finn from Blissology yoga, his name sounds like he's a hobbit but he was really motivational...even if he is a hobbit.
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After yoga, Mary and I enjoyed the beautiful weather and strolled along the beach, then head back to the house, grab a little rest, then go back to fest with Sandy and Glenn.

Sunday is the better line up, G Love, Milky Chance, Social D, Jack Johnson. G Love is awesome, I saw him about 15 yrs ago at a small club, he lights up a stage with his personality, whether he's playing for 200 or 20,000. He's got this great white trash philly style, very entertaining. Milky Chance was energetic and worked the crowd hard, they seemed so stoked to be there. I missed Social D, we wanted to get a good spot for Jack Johnson who was playing immediately after Social D on the opposite stage, this meant we missed Bruce making a surprise appearance during Social D's set but I'm not a Bruce fan and even though Mary is, she was still happier to get up close to the stage for Jack Johnson.

So yeah, Jacks Johnson, awesome performer, he's not just a voice, he delivers a song and is relaxed talking to 20,000 people, which not many performers are, only the great ones. He brought out a bunch of musicians who played earlier, which mixed it up and added for spontaneous sets that where inspiring and had great energy for performers and crowd.

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Like all good things, they must come to an end. Leaving Asbury Park at 10:30pm on Sunday night seems easy enough, but when 20,000 people want to leave at once, things get complicated and travel becomes a premium. Mary and I walked about a mile away in hopes of getting an Uber ride back to Brielle to Sandys house. They left earlier, Glenn didn't want to go into work in a coma Monday morning, where as me and Mary said fuck it, they won't fire me. I finally got an Uber ride but got raped for a 15 minute car ride. While in the car heading back, I saw a Wall cop had a middle aged woman on the side of the road doing a sobriety test, seeing this made me feel a little better in paying $100 for a ride home.
 

pooriggy

Well-Known Member
Team MTBNJ Halter's
At any point did you have your shirt off with PARTY NAKID written on your chest?
Shirt off yes, PARTY NAKID always implied, I'm not a tattoo guy but if I was...

What was notable was how little police presence there was, I guess if the law showed up they would have to enforce it, which can be difficult when people breaking laws where the majority.
 

mwlikesbikes

Well-Known Member
I don’t know why but it annoys me when people say Social D instead of Social Distortion.
I remember years ago one of the DJs on FM106.3 had a whole rant about it (wasn’t Pinfield) had to be early 1990s
 

pooriggy

Well-Known Member
Team MTBNJ Halter's
I would have skipped jack Johnson for social d, but sounds like a fun day.
Yeah, that was a tough call. After listening to a band I had to take a pee break, then refuel. Mary wanted to get a good spot close to the stage for JJ, which meant getting there early and camping out, after taking care of business I fought my way to the front and joined here, which was no small task, when confronted with people who wouldn't get out of my way I would tell them I have to meet my wife, with that they took pity on me and parted the waves.
It was funny, I was on line for food earlier and was talking to this biker dude about my age. He told me he was there for Social D and asked me what kind of music does Jack Johnson play, I said kinda the opposite of the band he's going to see.
@mwlikesbikes , I guess when a dj is on the air for 6 hrs he needs something to talk about. Did he rant about people saying Led Zep and the Stones as well? And there is always Sunny D.
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StayHydrated

Swedish Chef
Team MTBNJ Halter's
So yeah, Jacks Johnson, awesome performer, he's not just a voice, he delivers a song and is relaxed talking to 20,000 people, which not many performers are, only the great ones. He brought out a bunch of musicians who played earlier, which mixed it up and added for spontaneous sets that where inspiring and had great energy for performers and crowd.
Zach Gill, his keys/everything player is amazing. He's also in Animal Liberation Orchestra. When we saw JJ live at Jones Beach, Zach was absolutely RIPPING on the accordian. I don't know if you can get digital copies of it or stream it anywhere (I don't think so) but he did a live album at Jack White's Third Man Records that they cut direct-to-acetate for record store day a few years ago. It was a family-friendly event with breakfast, was cool and he panders to the kids too which was really neat to hear on the record.

Event photos: https://thirdmanrecords.com/calendar/past-events/jack-johnson-live-at-third-man-records/

Vinyl release here: https://thirdmanstore.com/jack-johnson-live-at-third-man-records

Absolutely worth the $15 bucks.
 

pooriggy

Well-Known Member
Team MTBNJ Halter's
Saturday I did my first cx race in 5 yrs, in 2013 I borrowed Utah's cx bike for Horseshoe cx, I don't count that disaster of a race where I crashed his bike in the same spot 3x and broke his shifter, the bars on that bike where like wrestling a steer, that bike rode me. I signed up for Hippo cx because a lot of the team was going to be there, my power numbers where good and I felt the need to test myself and get a good work out in. I raced my SS mtb, why not...Utah got 3rd a few weeks ago on his mtb, anything is possible. My only goal was to race hard and be as competitive as I can be on the bike I have.

The course had 3 distinct sections, the upper part, which was the start finish, this was the driest mud with twisting turns. The middle section was the wettest mud, this is where the jews got their cement to build the pyramids, it had the perfect combination of grass, mud and racers mixing it with their feet and tires to solidify any drivetrain. The last section on the back was off camber mud that you could kinda hold a line on followed my a 200m climb which crescendoed in elevation and spectators cheering you on.

There where 50 of us in the cat 4 race, 3 USA cycling dudes lined us up meticulously, one at a time, this took longer then our race. The process was serous business too, when they called out 69, no one even chuckled at my off color comments. Since I signed up on the last day, I was in the back row, which didn't matter much at the start. I was lined up ready to battle like John Snow but with all the twists and hard turns in the mud things turned into a CF quickly.

giphy (8).gif


Making some aggressive moves on the top of the course, I went into the middle muddy section in top 10, this went to top 20 when I attempted to ride the portland cement sections and 10 guys ran buy me. Ok, I got an education on when to ride and when to run, there where about 4 sections you had to run in the middle of the course, got it.

The back section began with the off camber thing, which I had no problem with on mtb tires, I passed about 3 people here and going into the 200m climb I came upon two more racers . These guys where side by side, with just enough room for me to thread the needle. As I approached I called out that I'm coming up, however the guy on my left decided to dismount and run the last 30 yrds, his right foot whipped around to come off his bike and hit my bike in the process, which sent him to the ground while I stayed upright and rode away. I feel bad that he hit the ground but at the same time I announced myself because I had a feeling that foot would be coming at me, if you are going to dismount with someone 30" from you, pull over a bit. He probably thinks I'm a dick but that's racing.

At the top of the start finish area of lap two I passed a few more people and got into 3rd place after riding side by side with a racer on the wooden rollover. So from this point on I chased the first and second place guys for 2 more laps and ended up finishing 15 seconds behind them and over 2 minutes ahead of the 4th place guy. Thank God we only did 4 laps, that course was a shit show, honestly we could have ended in 2 or 3 laps, it would have saved some drive trains.

Iggy race face.
20181015_195511.jpg


Yes, the course was muddy and they cut the grass prior to the race to define the layout. The strands of grass acted as a binding agent, while the mud was the carrier and helped congeal this mess onto bikes, which as we know reaked havoc. A lot of mechanical issues could have been prevented had they blown the grass off after mowing...but most people will just say, it rained, the course was muddy, there is nothing we can do about that. I'm not saying that blowing the grass off would have prevented mechanicals from happening, I'm saying there would have been a lot less.
This is what was left after washing off the mud, I had to pry this grass out with a screw driver. When I took my rear wheel off to clean it, the lock nut holding gear on was really loose, one more lap and it would have unthreaded completely.
20181015_180348.jpg


I know it's tough finding race promoters these days but imo if you are gonna host, then some reasonable standards should be met. Let USA cycling inspect the course prior to race to ensure standards. Why does everyone act like it's there first rodeo?

Mow grass, then blow it.
download (1).jpeg
 

stb222

Love Drunk
Jerk Squad
Saturday I did my first cx race in 5 yrs, in 2013 I borrowed Utah's cx bike for Horseshoe cx, I don't count that disaster of a race where I crashed his bike in the same spot 3x and broke his shifter, the bars on that bike where like wrestling a steer, that bike rode me. I signed up for Hippo cx because a lot of the team was going to be there, my power numbers where good and I felt the need to test myself and get a good work out in. I raced my SS mtb, why not...Utah got 3rd a few weeks ago on his mtb, anything is possible. My only goal was to race hard and be as competitive as I can be on the bike I have.

The course had 3 distinct sections, the upper part, which was the start finish, this was the driest mud with twisting turns. The middle section was the wettest mud, this is where the jews got their cement to build the pyramids, it had the perfect combination of grass, mud and racers mixing it with their feet and tires to solidify any drivetrain. The last section on the back was off camber mud that you could kinda hold a line on followed my a 200m climb which crescendoed in elevation and spectators cheering you on.

There where 50 of us in the cat 4 race, 3 USA cycling dudes lined us up meticulously, one at a time, this took longer then our race. The process was serous business too, when they called out 69, no one even chuckled at my off color comments. Since I signed up on the last day, I was in the back row, which didn't matter much at the start. I was lined up ready to battle like John Snow but with all the twists and hard turns in the mud things turned into a CF quickly.

View attachment 78971

Making some aggressive moves on the top of the course, I went into the middle muddy section in top 10, this went to top 20 when I attempted to ride the portland cement sections and 10 guys ran buy me. Ok, I got an education on when to ride and when to run, there where about 4 sections you had to run in the middle of the course, got it.

The back section began with the off camber thing, which I had no problem with on mtb tires, I passed about 3 people here and going into the 200m climb I came upon two more racers . These guys where side by side, with just enough room for me to thread the needle. As I approached I called out that I'm coming up, however the guy on my left decided to dismount and run the last 30 yrds, his right foot whipped around to come off his bike and hit my bike in the process, which sent him to the ground while I stayed upright and rode away. I feel bad that he hit the ground but at the same time I announced myself because I had a feeling that foot would be coming at me, if you are going to dismount with someone 30" from you, pull over a bit. He probably thinks I'm a dick but that's racing.

At the top of the start finish area of lap two I passed a few more people and got into 3rd place after riding side by side with a racer on the wooden rollover. So from this point on I chased the first and second place guys for 2 more laps and ended up finishing 15 seconds behind them and over 2 minutes ahead of the 4th place guy. Thank God we only did 4 laps, that course was a shit show, honestly we could have ended in 2 or 3 laps, it would have saved some drive trains.

Iggy race face.
View attachment 78972

Yes, the course was muddy and they cut the grass prior to the race to define the layout. The strands of grass acted as a binding agent, while the mud was the carrier and helped congeal this mess onto bikes, which as we know reaked havoc. A lot of mechanical issues could have been prevented had they blown the grass off after mowing...but most people will just say, it rained, the course was muddy, there is nothing we can do about that. I'm not saying that blowing the grass off would have prevented mechanicals from happening, I'm saying there would have been a lot less.
This is what was left after washing off the mud, I had to pry this grass out with a screw driver. When I took my rear wheel off to clean it, the lock nut holding gear on was really loose, one more lap and it would have unthreaded completely.
View attachment 78973

I know it's tough finding race promoters these days but imo if you are gonna host, then some reasonable standards should be met. Let USA cycling inspect the course prior to race to ensure standards. Why does everyone act like it's there first rodeo?

Mow grass, then blow it.
View attachment 78974
Great write up.

BTW, They don't call it grass roots racing for nothing....
 

pooriggy

Well-Known Member
Team MTBNJ Halter's
On Sunday, October 14th, I met up with the Jersey Shore Sea Kaykers to paddle around Manhattan. This group is like MTBNJ but with kayaks instead of bikes. I had to qualify to take part in this adventure, it involves 30+miles of paddling, with some water that can throw you out of your boat. I have the proper safety gear and know how to limit risk, so I got the thumbs up to join the group of 15.

20181017_204253.jpg


I have to admit I was a bit scared going into this. The most I've ever paddled was 7-8 miles, it wasn't the distance so much that I was nervous about but rather not knowing what the conditions would be like. Tides and winds can shift quickly, what starts out smooth as glass can change to angry water. Luckily there was nothing too sketchy that we encountered. The toughest water was after the Williamsburg Bridge, heading toward the UN building. The tides and amount of boat traffic in that area make that section a challenge.

20181015_093152.jpg


We launched at 7:30 am from Fort Wee under the GW. The winds were still and the Hudson was calm, which made for a peaceful start as we headed downtown along Manhattan. There was a lot of ferry traffic the closer we got to the Battery, we worked around that and made our way to cross over the waterway near the Brooklyn Bridge and landed on a small shore pebble beach. At this point we where a bit over 2hrs in, so it felt good to stretch legs, pee, eat and remove layers as needed.

20181017_204338.jpg


Looking back at that first 2 hrs of the trip, I'd say that was the best sight seeing aspect of the journey. The visual of downtown skyscrapers from the water, people walking along the greenway and the constant hustle of ferry traffic running back and forth with tourists to Ellis Island provided extraordinary scenes. Despite being on water, it felt like you where in the city, it had an energy to it that carried out into the water. I guess if I commuted into Manhattan everyday, these scenes would become routine and not feel fresh and new, but I don't work in the city so the experience was breath taking.

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After our Brooklyn Bridge stop we continued up the East River letting the tide pull us along at about 4 knots. Google tells me that 4 knots is 4.6mph, which feels good and requires little effort, which is a big help when doing a 30 mile trip. Around the UN building we encountered tidal races, this produces waves, which can be hazardous, this section was just exciting enough without giving us trouble.

20181015_053235.jpg


As we continued up the East River we passed Roosevelt Island on our right, it's amazing to see that much development on a relatively small island that sits in between Manhattan and Long Island. Shortly after is Randalls Island which sits in the middle of the Bronx, Queens and Harlem. I can remember taking Jamie to his soccer tournaments here when he was younger. It's an oasis of athletic fields in a city surrounded by millions of people. We beached our boats on its small Sandy shoreline to stretch, eat and take a bathroom break, I like this trip, we eat and go to the bathroom about every 2 hrs.

We cut this break short, since the tide was coming in and taking the beach and kayaks with it. We re-mounted and headed up the Harlem river for our last leg of the journey. While the East River was lively, with a fast moving current, the Harlem River was the opposite. I should point out that neither of these is actually a river but rather a salt water tidal estuary which connects bodies of water. Remember that, it's going to be on the test.

We enjoyed the peaceful water and where able to relax and enjoy conversation as we had an easy paddle toward the Hudson. Yankee stadium was a familiar site on our right as we made our way through the Bronx.
Washington Heights was up on our left, with its high cliffs and trees gradually replaced urban sprawl. I was surprised to hear the chatter of a kingfisher and other birds, I guess the water was not that polluted, actually I was surprised at how clean the water was throughout our trip.

As we paddled the upper end of the Harlem River, one of the guys in the group explained that this section was blasted in the 1890s to straighten and allow for larger ships to navigate it. Columbia University which is located near the river painted a giant C on the remnant of one of the rock formations in the 1950s, surprisingly this is the only graffiti in the area. We beached in this area referred to as Spuytan Duyvil, which was named by the Dutch in the 1640's . The native Indians had names for all these bodies of water around Manhattan as well but there just too god damn hard to pronounce. Could you imagine calling the Hudson the Muhheakunnuk, which is actually a fun word once you learn how to pronounce it.

After this stop, it was less then 2 miles across the Hudson back to the GW bridge. Me and a few other people still had some gas in the tank so we pushed the pace and raced our boats back. We waited for the others to beach and helped them pull there kayaks out and load them on their cars. Everyone had a glow, with a sense of satisfaction after our circumnavigation, some of the people where 60-70yrs. old, which is impressive. This trip was like one of those first big mtb rides you do, epic, after doing something 1000 times, it doesn't have the same influence it did the first time. Going around Manhattan in a kayak gives one a sense of history, geography, and nature trek, much like native people did hundreds of years ago. Incredible.
 

The Kalmyk

Well-Known Member
On Sunday, October 14th, I met up with the Jersey Shore Sea Kaykers to paddle around Manhattan. This group is like MTBNJ but with kayaks instead of bikes. I had to qualify to take part in this adventure, it involves 30+miles of paddling, with some water that can throw you out of your boat. I have the proper safety gear and know how to limit risk, so I got the thumbs up to join the group of 15.

View attachment 79475

I have to admit I was a bit scared going into this. The most I've ever paddled was 7-8 miles, it wasn't the distance so much that I was nervous about but rather not knowing what the conditions would be like. Tides and winds can shift quickly, what starts out smooth as glass can change to angry water. Luckily there was nothing too sketchy that we encountered. The toughest water was after the Williamsburg Bridge, heading toward the UN building. The tides and amount of boat traffic in that area make that section a challenge.

View attachment 79472

We launched at 7:30 am from Fort Wee under the GW. The winds were still and the Hudson was calm, which made for a peaceful start as we headed downtown along Manhattan. There was a lot of ferry traffic the closer we got to the Battery, we worked around that and made our way to cross over the waterway near the Brooklyn Bridge and landed on a small shore pebble beach. At this point we where a bit over 2hrs in, so it felt good to stretch legs, pee, eat and remove layers as needed.

View attachment 79473

Looking back at that first 2 hrs of the trip, I'd say that was the best sight seeing aspect of the journey. The visual of downtown skyscrapers from the water, people walking along the greenway and the constant hustle of ferry traffic running back and forth with tourists to Ellis Island provided extraordinary scenes. Despite being on water, it felt like you where in the city, it had an energy to it that carried out into the water. I guess if I commuted into Manhattan everyday, these scenes would become routine and not feel fresh and new, but I don't work in the city so the experience was breath taking.

View attachment 79474

After our Brooklyn Bridge stop we continued up the East River letting the tide pull us along at about 4 knots. Google tells me that 4 knots is 4.6mph, which feels good and requires little effort, which is a big help when doing a 30 mile trip. Around the UN building we encountered tidal races, this produces waves, which can be hazardous, this section was just exciting enough without giving us trouble.

View attachment 79476

As we continued up the East River we passed Roosevelt Island on our right, it's amazing to see that much development on a relatively small island that sits in between Manhattan and Long Island. Shortly after is Randalls Island which sits in the middle of the Bronx, Queens and Harlem. I can remember taking Jamie to his soccer tournaments here when he was younger. It's an oasis of athletic fields in a city surrounded by millions of people. We beached our boats on its small Sandy shoreline to stretch, eat and take a bathroom break, I like this trip, we eat and go to the bathroom about every 2 hrs.

We cut this break short, since the tide was coming in and taking the beach and kayaks with it. We re-mounted and headed up the Harlem river for our last leg of the journey. While the East River was lively, with a fast moving current, the Harlem River was the opposite. I should point out that neither of these is actually a river but rather a salt water tidal estuary which connects bodies of water. Remember that, it's going to be on the test.

We enjoyed the peaceful water and where able to relax and enjoy conversation as we had an easy paddle toward the Hudson. Yankee stadium was a familiar site on our right as we made our way through the Bronx.
Washington Heights was up on our left, with its high cliffs and trees gradually replaced urban sprawl. I was surprised to hear the chatter of a kingfisher and other birds, I guess the water was not that polluted, actually I was surprised at how clean the water was throughout our trip.

As we paddled the upper end of the Harlem River, one of the guys in the group explained that this section was blasted in the 1890s to straighten and allow for larger ships to navigate it. Columbia University which is located near the river painted a giant C on the remnant of one of the rock formations in the 1950s, surprisingly this is the only graffiti in the area. We beached in this area referred to as Spuytan Duyvil, which was named by the Dutch in the 1640's . The native Indians had names for all these bodies of water around Manhattan as well but there just too god damn hard to pronounce. Could you imagine calling the Hudson the Muhheakunnuk, which is actually a fun word once you learn how to pronounce it.

After this stop, it was less then 2 miles across the Hudson back to the GW bridge. Me and a few other people still had some gas in the tank so we pushed the pace and raced our boats back. We waited for the others to beach and helped them pull there kayaks out and load them on their cars. Everyone had a glow, with a sense of satisfaction after our circumnavigation, some of the people where 60-70yrs. old, which is impressive. This trip was like one of those first big mtb rides you do, epic, after doing something 1000 times, it doesn't have the same influence it did the first time. Going around Manhattan in a kayak gives one a sense of history, geography, and nature trek, much like native people did hundreds of years ago. Incredible.

Did you seal all open wounds before entering water?
 

pooriggy

Well-Known Member
Team MTBNJ Halter's
Did you seal all open wounds before entering water?
Yeah, the East River has a long history of pollution. I'm not saying it's clean, but better then it was 30 yrs ago.
This is from Wiki.
Throughout most of the history of New York City, and New Amsterdam before it, the East River has been the receptacle for the city's garbage and sewage. "Night men" who collected "night soil" from outdoor privies would dump their loads into the river, and even after the construction of the Croton Aqueduct (1842) and then the New Croton Aqueduct (1890) gave rise to indoor plumbing, the waste that was flushed away into the sewers, where it mixed with ground run off, ran directly into the river, untreated. The sewers terminated at the slips where ships docked, until the waste began to build up, preventing dockage, after which the outfalls were moved to the end of the piers. The "landfill" which created new land along the shoreline when the river was "wharfed out" by the sale of "water lots" was largely garbage such as bones, offal, and even whole dead animals, along with excrement – human and animal.[58][59] The result was that by the 1850s, if not before, the East River, like the other waterways around the city, was undergoing the process of eutrophication where the increase in nitrogen from excrement and other sources led to a decrease in free oxygen, which in turn led to an increase in phytoplankton such as algae and a decrease in other life forms, breaking the area's established food chain. The East River became very polluted, and its animal life decreased drastically.[60]